The Great Gatsby Essay | The Great Gatsby: The Horrors of His Society

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 886 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Great Gatsby: The Horrors of His Society

The Great Gatsby: The Horrors of His Society

Summary: Analyzes a passage from 'The Great Gatsby' by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Explores how through this passage Fitzgerald conveys the horrors of his society. Discusses his use of corrupt images, brutal reality and the detailed use of language and syntax.
How in this passage does Fitzgerald convey the horrors of his society"

In this passage, Fitzgerald uses a variety of corrupt images to represent the horrific society in which the novel is based. He further underlines the brutal reality of these images and what they signify by his detailed use of language and syntax, and through the portrayal of certain characters.

Within their relationship, Fitzgerald strongly identifies Tom and Myrtle as symbols of a corrupt society - `[Tom's] acquaintances resented the fact that he turned up in popular cafes with [Myrtle] and...sauntered about, chatting with whomsoever he knew'. Fitzgerald's use of present participles communicates a sense of movement, which illustrates Tom's reckless flaunting of his adultery, and thereby represents the immoral society. Tom's arrogance is demonstrated highly when he obliges Nick to meet his mistress, `the supercilious assumption was that on...

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This section contains 886 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Great Gatsby: The Horrors of His Society
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