Lord of the Flies Essay | Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies"

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies".
This section contains 396 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies"

Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies"

Summary: Essay analyzes the theme of savagery and how it is portrayed in the novel, "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding.
Most people's idea of the savage is one of an especially uncivilized, barbaric, or primitive creature. In Lord of the Flies, the transformation of a group of English schoolboys from civilized beings to savages is described. In the novel, William Golding uses the ever-increasing brutality of the hunts to illustrate the escalating savagery on the island.

The first hunt depicts the innocence of the boys and can be contrasted with subsequent hunts. When Jack is incapable of killing a pig tangled in the creepers Golding writes, "They knew very well why he hadn't (killed the pig): because of the enormity of the knife descending and cutting into living flesh; because of the unbearable blood." This quote shows that the boys feel uncomfortable with the thought of killing the pig, illustrating society's enduring hold on each of them. Jack already begins to tear out...

(read more)

This section contains 396 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies"
Copyrights
BookRags Student Essays
Savagery Portrayed in "Lord of the Flies" from BookRags Student Essays. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.