1984 Essay | The Linguistic Revolution:The Relation Between Class, Language, and Ideology In 1984

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The Linguistic Revolution:The Relation Between Class, Language, and Ideology In 1984

Summary: An essay discussing Newspeak and its relation to keeping the proletariat from committing a rebellion through regulating their language.
While almost all novels contain some sort of political allusion or connotation, few novels are as directly political as George Orwell's 1984. From beginning to end, the novel is an epic and shocking piece, a strong precautionary tale against the ills of extreme totalitarianism. In it, Orwell paints a dismal future, one where individualism ceases and citizens are held in rigid class structures by the government with the threat of physical harm and, more importantly, through powerful mental conditioning, particularly through the reduction of nuances and shades of meaning within language. Indeed, the manipulation of language plays a vital role in the social stratification of the masses, since without the proper tools of language and thought, the mentality for rebellion is not possible, even if there was enough physical power to do so. According to Louis Althusser, writer of `Ideology...

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This section contains 1,247 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Linguistic Revolution:The Relation Between Class, Language, and Ideology In 1984
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