Julius Caesar Essay | "Et tu, Brutè? Then fall, Caesar!"

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of "Et tu, Brut? Then fall, Caesar!".
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"Et tu, Brut? Then fall, Caesar!"

Summary: I wrote the essay about two weeks ago, although I didn't receive a considerate good grade on it, my teacher still commented that the essay was well-written, so I actually made the mistake of following the proper instructions... so the essay is good as itself, not following any outside forced structures. The essay just simply describes the quote "Et tu, Brutè? Then fall, Caesar!" In the first paragraph, it is simply described how it had happened, the second paragraphs relates it to a life experience of my own (Not true!) Use the essay by any means whatsoever, butcher it all you want, I don't care.

And for the play itself, Julius Caesar... you should all know it is written by William Shakespeare.

Thanks,

Umar Khan


"Et tu, Brutè? Then fall, Caesar!"

Act III, Scene I, Line 77

In the play Julius Caesar, these famous and ironic last words are spoken by the leader of Rome, Julius Caesar himself. Although firstly in the play, he is warned by the soothsayer, Artimedorus, and his wife not to bring upon his presence to the way to the Capitol, Caesar still puts all aside and is deceived by Decius that Calphurnia's dream foreshadowed nothing, "The dream is all amiss interpreted..." (Act Two, Scene 2, Line 83) Caesar, unfortunately, is erroneously lead to believe of his own superciliousness and makes his decision to go. Caesar arrives at the Senate and is killed by the conspirators. Firstly, Caesar is stabbed by Casca with the words: "Speak, hands, for me!" (Act Three, Scene 1, Line 77) Then the rest of the conspirators follow, each stabbing Caesar, when at last...

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This section contains 463 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "Et tu, Brut? Then fall, Caesar!"
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