Federalist Essay | Men of Little Faith

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Men of Little Faith.
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Men of Little Faith

Summary: Was the label Men of Little Faith applied with merit to the Federalists?
Prior to the 19th century's nascence, an affluence of tensions began to arise between the Anti-Federalists (i.e., the Democratic Republicans) and the Federalists. A characterization was later given to the Anti-Federalists as a peculiar witticism; that is, the Anti-Federalists were said to be "men of little faith." However, this statement is not entirely restricted to the Jeffersonians, for there are numerous differences between the parties revealing a mutual, but also contradictory, lack of faith.

As a whole, both the Federalists and the Republicans lacked faith in one another in terms of economics, foreign policy, and, most paramount, governing power. Jeffersonians clearly exhibited their faithlessness in condensed rule by their weakening of the central government in order to assure individual states' rights. With the Federalists, however, came a more powerful central government, which lessened states' rights and showed the Federalistic lack of reliance in the people...

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This section contains 713 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Men of Little Faith
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