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Essay | Diction in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Diction in The Awakening by Kate Chopin.
This section contains 352 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Diction in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Diction in The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Summary: The author of The Awakening, Kate Chopin, uses her own unique style of diction to convey the tone and theme of the piece to the reader.
Within the course of the novel, Chopin uses formal language, conveying the fact that the characters about whom she is writing, are the wealthy upper-class, the type of people who would use very formal language. Even in Edna's mind, her thoughts are formal; "this may seem like a ponderous weight of wisdom to descend upon the soul of a young woman of twenty-eight." (page 57) Chopin's description of Edna's awakening foreshadows Edna's downfall, conveying a tone of sympathy towards her. The author also exhibits a resentful tone. Through Edna, Chopin's feelings for society are apparent when society forces her into a role where she is "a dupe to illusions." (page 171) Although Chopin is sympathetic of Edna, she is also reprimanding, showing Edna to be irresponsible and child like. How could a mother feel "a sort of relief." (page 63) because her children are gone? Chopin's...

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This section contains 352 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Diction in The Awakening by Kate Chopin
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