Forgot your password?  

Essay | What The Catcher in the Rye Says about the 1950's

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of What The Catcher in the Rye Says about the 1950's.
This section contains 1,263 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on What The Catcher in the Rye Says about the 1950's

What The Catcher in the Rye Says about the 1950's

Summary: "The Catcher in the Rye" as a window into the 1950's.
J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye is a remarkable book that gives readers a unique and perhaps gloomy perspective of the 1950's through Holden Caulfield, a cynical and peculiar teenager. Through The Catcher in the Rye Salinger describes important aspects of the 1950's. Salinger emphasizes several key characteristics of the 50's and criticizes them through Holden. In addition, Holden Caulfield is a very interesting character with several traits that put him at odds with society.

Holden attacks various weaknesses in the 50's society. He criticizes nearly everything that he observes, and refuses to pull punches. Often Holden uses his brilliant talent of observation to discover the true motives behind the people he calls "phony." Through his observations the reader can interpret Salinger's view of the 1950's culture. Holden's perceptions of paranoia, conformity, and the consumer culture convey Salinger's...

(read more)

This section contains 1,263 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on What The Catcher in the Rye Says about the 1950's
Follow Us on Facebook