Of Mice and Men Essay | Lennie's Strength Is His Own Enemy

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Lennie's Strength Is His Own Enemy.
This section contains 209 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)

Lennie's Strength Is His Own Enemy

Summary: Essay is about how Lennie's strength can benefit him as well as to hurt him in "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.
In Of Mice and Men, Lennie's role was performed as a mentally disabled person. Lennie was a big, tall man with large hands, and he was very strong. The question was asked if Lennie's strength was too much for him to be capable of or was his strength his own enemy? Yes seems to be the answer, because his own strength seems to be in the way. If only he wasn't as strong as he was, if he was just more gentle with his touch, Lennie might have been a little better off.

Lennie doesn`t know his own strength. When he was frustrated or nervous he had even less control of what he is doing. For example, Lennie broke Curly's hand and he accidentally killed Curly's wife that was done partially by fear. People around Lennie, except for George, didn't understand him and they weren't use to a man making many mistakes.

Lennie's strength had his benefits and had its downs. Lennie not knowing his own strength was a great disadvantage to him and to part of his surroundings. If Lennie had more people around him who understood him and could help him, he could have more control of his strength or had less troubles. Lennie strength is his own enemy.

This section contains 209 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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