The Pardoner's Prologue and Tale Essay | Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Irony in Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales.
This section contains 464 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Irony in Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales

Irony in Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales

Summary: Essay describes the satire and irony Geoffrey Chaucer uses in "The Pardoner's Tale."
Throughout the Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales written by Chaucer, it is evident the fully developed satire of the avarice and corruption in the church during the era. Chaucer in this tale accentuates the moral characteristics of the Pardoner through use of irony and the obvious relationship between the narrator of the story (the Pardoner) and the tale that he tells (the Pardoner's tale).

Already, in the prologue, the pardoner depicts himself as a man of greed. "I preach nothing except for gain" ( ). His admittance to selling fraudulent pardons for the sole intention of unjustly gaining money contradicts his moralistic story and teaching. For example, he uses the biblical idea, that "avarice is the root of all evil"( )in his sermons. Ironically, and hypocritically, the pardoner is an extremely avaricious man, who attempts to cheat money off of travelers by granting them forgiveness for their former sins...

(read more)

This section contains 464 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Irony in Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales
Copyrights
BookRags
Irony in Pardoner's Tale of the Canterbury Tales from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook