The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Huck Finn Symbolism.
This section contains 488 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Huck Finn Symbolism: the Mississippi River

Huck Finn Symbolism: the Mississippi River

Summary: The use of the river as a symbol in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."
The Mississippi River in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the ultimate symbol of freedom. It provides an escape from different deterrents for the book's two main characters, Jim, a runaway slave, and Huck a young, adopted boy. For one, the river is an escape from the cramped style of society and civilization. However, for the other, the river is an escape from slavery, a passage to the free world.

For Huck, the river is a passage away from society. He can escape civilization and live freely by his own rules. On land, Huck is either under watch of the Widow Douglas or under force of Pap. With the widow, he has to wear stiff clothes, educate himself, and go to church. While not residing with the widow, Huck must stay with Pap. There, he is fallen prisoner to his own father...

(read more)

This section contains 488 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Huck Finn Symbolism: the Mississippi River
Copyrights
BookRags
Huck Finn Symbolism: the Mississippi River from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.