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Essay | Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy.
This section contains 221 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy

Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy

Summary: Summary of tragedy according to Aristotle's Poetics.
According to Aristotle, many components make up a tragedy. It must be serious, and the action is complete and with magnitude. The language includes rhythm and harmony, introduced in separate parts of the work. A tragedy is performed rather than narrated, arouses the emotions of pity and fear, and accomplishes a catharsis of these emotions.

Plot, character, thought, diction, song, and spectacle are the six basic components in a tragedy, in order of importance. The plot of a tragedy should focus on only a single conflict that takes place during the course of a day. The central character of a tragedy should be a famous person who goes from fortune to misfortune as the result of an error in judgment. He is neither better nor worse than the audience. The audience should be able to relate to the hero and will therefore feel pity and fear...

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This section contains 221 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy
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