To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Innocence in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

This student essay consists of approximately 1 page of analysis of Innocence in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee.
This section contains 220 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)

Innocence in "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

Summary: Essay answers the questions of why the book is called "To Kill a Mockingbird", the significance of mockingbirds to the story, and what characters can be compared to mockingbirds.
The book is called To Kill a Mockingbird because it is about losing ones innocence. As the story progresses, the characters grow and learn some of the hard lessons of life. Scout grows up by learning that she has to be a lady to some people and to be herself around others. Jem learns that not all men are treated equal. Dill learns this as well and is upset by it.

"Mockingbirds don't do one thing--but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat up people's gardens, don't nest in corncribs. They don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird" (Lee, p. 90). This quote shows the reader that we shouldn't destroy a person's innocence, but that we should revere it. Also, that we should treasure it as long as we can.

Scout is usually the one compared to the mockingbird in this story for numerous reasons. This is because of her age and her naivety. She is unaware that the things she does reflect upon herself. She is also compared to a mockingbird because she usually brings joy into the lives she touches but is unaware of it. Although she is not the only character in To Kill a Mockingbird, she is the most obvious in her innocence.

This section contains 220 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
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