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Essay | The Themes of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of The Themes of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible".
This section contains 596 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Themes of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"

The Themes of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"

Summary: Essay discusses the two main themes of "The Crucible" by Arthur Miller.
One of the themes in Arthur Miller's, The Crucible, involves the principle of dying with nobility rather than compromising one's morals for life. John Proctor was the character Miller chose to convey this theme. Proctor had the choice to "confess", or in reality lie, about his accused witchcraft and dissembling the court. Though he would have been saving his own life by confessing his wrongful acts, Proctor would have been admitting to a crime he had not committed. Even Hale, who knew Proctor was innocent of siding with the devil, pleaded with John to sign his confession. Hale stated that God would damn a liar less, than He would one who gave himself up for pride. Some may have even considered the act of condemning oneself an act of suicide. Although, word of his lechery had most likely spread around the village, almost...

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This section contains 596 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Themes of Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"
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