The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay | The Use of Symbolism and Satire in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Use of Symbolism and Satire in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn".
This section contains 794 words
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The Use of Symbolism and Satire in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

Summary: Shows how Mark Twain uses satire and symbolism in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn."
Huckleberry Finn is a Picaresque novel in which Mark Twain uses the natural world as a source of satire and symbolism for the society.

For Huck and Jim, the Mississippi River is the ultimate symbol of freedom. Alone on their raft, they flow with the water and never remain in one place for long enough to be pinned down by a particular set of rules. For Jim, the river leads toward the free states, and for Huck, away from his abusive father and the restrictive "sivilizing" of St. Petersburg. Twain juxtaposes the river and the landed settlements along the banks. The Mississippi River represents a paradise, where Huck and Jim, free of hassles and disapproving stares, can enjoy one another's company and partake in the small pleasures of life, like smoking a pipe and watching the stars. "We...

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This section contains 794 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Use of Symbolism and Satire in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
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