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Essay | Corruption in the Medieval Churches: The Summoner's Tale

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Corruption in the Medieval Churches.
This section contains 602 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Corruption in the Medieval Churches: The Summoner's Tale

Corruption in the Medieval Churches: The Summoner's Tale

Summary: Discusses the Church corruption presented in Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" and "The Summoner's Tale."
Chaucer presents corruption in the medieval churches through "The Summoner's Prologue" and "The Summoner's Tale" by discussing a friar's actions of deceit, disobedience, and dishonesty toward compassionate people.

Being deceitful is contradicting to the beliefs of the church and above all contradicting to God himself. Deceit is commonly mistaken for cheating, although deceit is also an act designed to mislead another. Presented in Chaucer's work, deceit is used to convince people to purchase fake objects and pay for false prayers and pardons from the church. Specifically, In "The Summoner's Tale" the Friar tries to induce the wife to give him unnecessary items, especially food. In his case, the church forbids having more than you need of anything. "If I could have a little chicken-liver, And some of your bread-the merest shiver-...The sustenance is I take is very spare; You see my...

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This section contains 602 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Corruption in the Medieval Churches: The Summoner's Tale
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