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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 626 pages of information about The Young Step-Mother.

Nothing could be more disarming than such genuine sorrow; and Sophy, pardoning him with all her heart, and mourning for her past want of charity, watched him, longing to do something for his comfort, and to evince her tenderness; but only succeeded in encumbering every petty service or word of intercourse with a weight of sad consciousness.

CHAPTER XXI.

‘I had almost written to ask your pardon,’ said Mrs. Dusautoy, as Albinia entered her drawing-room on the afternoon following.  ’I should like by way of experiment to know what would put that boy out of countenance.  He listened with placid graciousness to his uncle’s lecture, and then gave us to understand that he was obliged for his solicitude, and that there was a great deal of jealousy and misrepresentation at Oxford; but he thought it best always to submit to authorities, however unreasonable.  And this morning, after amiably paying his respects to me, he said he was going to inquire for Gilbert.  I intimated that Willow Lawn was the last place where he would be welcome, but he was far above attending to me.  Did Gilbert see him?’

’Gilbert was in the garden with us when we were told he was in the house.  Poor fellow, he shuddered, and looked as if he wanted me to guard him, so I sent him out walking with Maurice while I went in, and found Lucy entertaining the gentleman.  I made myself as cold and inhospitable as I could, but I am afraid he rather relishes a dignified retenue.’

’Poor boy!  I wonder what on earth is to be done with him.  I never before knew what John’s love and patience were.’

‘Do you think he will remain here?’

’I cannot tell; we talk of tutors, but John is really, I believe, happier for having him here, and besides one can be sure the worst he is doing is painting a lobster.  However, much would depend on what you and Mr. Kendal thought.  If he and Gilbert were doing harm to each other, everything must give way.’

’If people of that age will not keep themselves out of harm’s way, nobody can do it for them,’ said Albinia, ’and as long as Gilbert continues in his present mood, there is more real separation in voluntarily holding aloof, than if they were sent far apart, only to come together again at college.’

Gilbert did continue in the same mood.  The tender cherishing of his home restored his spirits; but he was much subdued, and deeply grateful, as he manifested by the most eager and affectionate courtesy, such as made him almost the servant of everybody, without any personal aim or object, except to work up his deficient studies, and to avoid young Dusautoy.  He seemed to cling to his family as his protectors, and to follow the occupations least likely to lead to a meeting with the Polysyllable; he was often at church in the week, rode with his father, went parish visiting with the ladies, and was responsible when Maurice fished for minnows in the meadows.  Nothing could be more sincerely desirous to atone for the past and enter on a different course, and no conduct could be more truly humble or endearing.

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