A Tramp Abroad — Volume 03 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 64 pages of information about A Tramp Abroad — Volume 03.

But there were some who believed it had never been a well at all, and was never deeper than it is now—­eighty feet; that at that depth a subterranean passage branched from it and descended gradually to a remote place in the valley, where it opened into somebody’s cellar or other hidden recess, and that the secret of this locality is now lost.  Those who hold this belief say that herein lies the explanation that Dilsberg, besieged by Tilly and many a soldier before him, was never taken:  after the longest and closest sieges the besiegers were astonished to perceive that the besieged were as fat and hearty as ever, and were well furnished with munitions of war—­therefore it must be that the Dilsbergers had been bringing these things in through the subterranean passage all the time.

The children said that there was in truth a subterranean outlet down there, and they would prove it.  So they set a great truss of straw on fire and threw it down the well, while we leaned on the curb and watched the glowing mass descend.  It struck bottom and gradually burned out.  No smoke came up.  The children clapped their hands and said: 

“You see!  Nothing makes so much smoke as burning straw—­now where did the smoke go to, if there is no subterranean outlet?”

So it seemed quite evident that the subterranean outlet indeed existed.  But the finest thing within the ruin’s limits was a noble linden, which the children said was four hundred years old, and no doubt it was.  It had a mighty trunk and a mighty spread of limb and foliage.  The limbs near the ground were nearly the thickness of a barrel.

That tree had witnessed the assaults of men in mail —­how remote such a time seems, and how ungraspable is the fact that real men ever did fight in real armor!—­and it had seen the time when these broken arches and crumbling battlements were a trim and strong and stately fortress, fluttering its gay banners in the sun, and peopled with vigorous humanity—­how impossibly long ago that seems!—­and here it stands yet, and possibly may still be standing here, sunning itself and dreaming its historical dreams, when today shall have been joined to the days called “ancient.”

Well, we sat down under the tree to smoke, and the captain delivered himself of his legend: 

THE LEGEND OF DILSBERG CASTLE

It was to this effect.  In the old times there was once a great company assembled at the castle, and festivity ran high.  Of course there was a haunted chamber in the castle, and one day the talk fell upon that.  It was said that whoever slept in it would not wake again for fifty years.  Now when a young knight named Conrad von Geisberg heard this, he said that if the castle were his he would destroy that chamber, so that no foolish person might have the chance to bring so dreadful a misfortune upon himself and afflict such as loved him with the memory of it.  Straightway, the company privately laid their heads together to contrive some way to get this superstitious young man to sleep in that chamber.

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A Tramp Abroad — Volume 03 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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