La Vendée eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 530 pages of information about La Vende.

Title:  La Vendee

Author:  Anthony Trollope

Release Date:  May, 2004 [EBook #5709] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on October 23, 2002] [Most recently updated:  October 23, 2002]

Edition:  10

Language:  English with some French

Character set encoding:  Latin1

*** Start of the project gutenberg EBOOK, la Vendee ***

This eBook was produced by Andrew Turek.

LA VENDEE.

VOLUME I

CHAPTER I

THE POITEVINS

The history of France in 1792 has been too fully written, and too generally read to leave the novelist any excuse for describing the state of Paris at the close of the summer of that year.  It is known to every one that the palace of Louis XVI was sacked on the 10th of August.  That he himself with his family took refuge in the National Assembly, and that he was taken thence to the prison of the Temple.

The doings on the fatal 10th of August, and the few following days had, however, various effects in Paris, all of which we do not clearly trace in history.  We well know how the Mountain became powerful from that day; that from that day Marat ceased to shun the light, and Danton to curb the licence of his tongue that then, patriotism in France began to totter, and that, from that time, Paris ceased to be a fitting abode for aught that was virtuous, innocent, or high-minded; but the steady march of history cannot stop to let us see the various lights in which the inhabitants of Paris regarded the loss of a King, and the commencement of the first French Republic.

The Assembly, though it had not contemplated the dethronement of the King, acquiesced in it; and acted as it would have done, had the establishment of a republic been decreed by a majority of its members.  The municipality had determined that the King should fall, and, of course, rejoiced in the success of its work; and history plainly marking the acquiescence of the Assembly, and the activity of the city powers, naturally passes over the various feelings excited in different circles in Paris, by the overthrow of the monarchy.

Up to that period there was still in Paris much that was high, noble, and delightful.  The haute noblesse had generally left the country; but the haute noblesse did not comprise the better educated, or most social families in Paris.  Never had there been more talent, more wit, or more beauty in Paris than at the commencement of 1792; never had literary acquirement been more fully appreciated in society, more absolutely necessary in those who were ambitious of social popularity.

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La Vendée from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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