Palaces and Courts of the Exposition eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 65 pages of information about Palaces and Courts of the Exposition.

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As you have now rehearsed your history and have in mind what has been done by the United States in regard to the Panama Canal (the Tower of Jewels), walk thru the Court of the Universe to the Esplanade where stands the Column of Progress.

The Column of Progress

The prototype of this column is seen in Trajan’s Column in the Forum of Trajan or in the Column of Marcus Aurelius, in Rome.

Architect — Symmes Richardson, one of the junior partners of the firm of McKim, Meade and White of New York.

The bas-reliefs at the base are by Isadore Konti of New York.

The sum of all human effort is represented.  Man’s spiritual progress is seen on the four sides of the base.

Atlas rolling the heavens suggests the passage of time.

Men with their different ideals in the long procession of progress are seen.  Some go manfully on, some fearfully, some feel the need of the sword to win their way, others find companions necessary, but all of these men and women must have faith (represented by the two meaningful women at the door), the hope of the palm of victory, and hear the bugle call as they go on their upward climb.

They pass before us, these men and women of different aspirations, and disappear from view.

Up, up they climb.

At the top of the column is Hermon A. McNeil’s Burden Bearers, supporting his Adventurous Bowman.

“All must toil to win” and some must bend their backs that others may rise.  Has it not been so at the Panama Canal?

Have not many done the labor that the United States, the Adventurous Bowman, may win?

This purposeful type of manhood, with magnificent decision, has just drawn the bow, and on has sped the arrow of success.

The bowman looks to see it hit the mark.

The man on the right possibly is one of his aids.

The little woman at his side will know by his eyes if the arrow has gone home, and she will then bestow upon him the laurel wreath and the palm of victory which she holds in her hand.  She stands ready to help him.

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See the group from the sea-wall directly in front of the Column of Progress for the splendid purpose expressed in the figure and on the face of the “Adventurous Bowman.”

Many San Franciscans would like to have this wonderful group duplicated in bronze to remain permanently with the city of the Exposition of 1915.

The Court of the Ages and not The Court of Abundance

Architect — Louis Christian Mullgardt of San Francisco.

Architecture — If one could call this beautiful architecture by name one might say Spanish Gothic, on account of the round-arched Gothic and also the Spanish finials used, but it is so thoroughly original that this is hardly the term to use.  It is Romanesque in its vaulting of the corridor, and at first glance in its great square tower, and arches, and yet not Romanesque architecture.

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Project Gutenberg
Palaces and Courts of the Exposition from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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