In the Blue Pike — Complete eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 148 pages of information about In the Blue Pike — Complete.

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Buy indugence for sins to be committed in the future
Mirrors were not allowed in the convent

IN THE BLUE PIKE

By Georg Ebers

Volume 3.

CHAPTER VIII.

As Kuni’s troubled soul had derived so much benefit from the short pilgrimage to Altotting, she hoped to obtain far more from a visit to Santiago di Compostella, famed throughout Christendom.

True, her old master, Loni, whom she had met at Regensburg, permitted her to join his band, but when she perceived that he was far less prosperous than before, and that she could not be useful to him in any way, she left him at Cologne because a kindhearted captain offered to take her to Vlissingen without pay.  Thence she really did set out upon the pilgrimage to Santiago di Compostella; but St. James, the patron saint of the Spaniards, whose untiring mercy so many praised, did not prove specially favourable to her.  The voyage to Compostella, the principal place where he was reverenced, which annually attracted thousands of pilgrims, cost her her last penny, and the cold nights which she was obliged to spend on deck increased her cough until it became almost unendurably violent.

In Santiago di Compostella both her means and her strength were exhausted.  After vainly expecting for a long time some token of the saint’s helpful kindness, only two courses were left:  either she must remain in Compostella and join the beggars in the crowded road to the place of pilgrimage, or she must accept the proposal made by tongueless Cyriax and go back with him to Germany.  At first she had been afraid of the brutal fellow, who feigned insanity and was led about by his wife with a chain; but once, when red-haired Gitta was seized by the Inquisition, and spent two days and two nights in jail, and Kuni nursed her child in her place, she had found him more friendly.  Besides, in Compostella, the swearer had been in his most cheerful mood.  Every day had filled his purse, because there was no lack of people and he understood how to extort money by the terror which horrible outbreaks of his feigned malady inspired among the densely crowded pilgrims.  His wife possessed a remedy which would instantly calm his ravings, but it was expensive, and she had not the money to buy it.  Not only in Compostella, but also on the long journey from Bavaria through the Swiss mountains, France, Navarre, and the whole of northern Spain, there were always kind-hearted or timid people from whom the money for the “dear prescription” could be obtained.

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In the Blue Pike — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.