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Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 285 pages of information about The Burgomaster's Wife Complete.

CHAPTER XXVI.

On the morning of the following day the spacious shooting-grounds, situated not far from the White Gate, between the Rapenburg and the city-wall, presented a busy scene, for by a decree of the council the citizens and inhabitants, without exception, no matter whether they were poor or rich, of noble or plebeian birth, were to take a solemn oath to be loyal to the Prince and the good cause.

Commissioner Van Bronkhorst, Burgomaster Van der Werff, and two other magistrates, clad in festal attire, stood under a group of beautiful linden-trees to receive the oaths of the men and youths, who flocked to the spot.  The solemn ceremonial had not yet commenced.  Janus Dousa, in full uniform, a coat of mail over his doublet and a helmet on his head, arm-in-arm with Van Hout, approached Meister Peter and the commissioner, saying:  “Here it is again!  Not one of the humbler citizens and workmen is absent, but the gentlemen in velvet and fur are but thinly represented.”

“They shall come yet!” cried the city clerk menacingly.

“What will formal vows avail?” replied the burgomaster.  “Whoever desires liberty, must grant it.  Besides, this hour will teach us on whom we can depend.”

“Not a single man of the militia is absent,” said the commissioner.

“There is comfort in that.  What is stirring yonder in the linden?”

The men looked up and perceived Adrian, who was swaying in the top of the tree, as a concealed listener.  “The boy must be everywhere,” exclaimed Peter.  “Come down, saucy lad.  You appear at a convenient time.”

The boy clung to a limb with his hands, let himself drop to the ground and stood before his father with a penitent face, which he knew how to assume when occasion required.  The burgomaster uttered no further words of reproof, but bade him go home and tell his mother, that he saw no possibility of getting Belotti through the Spanish lines in safety, and also that Father Damianus had promised to call on the young lady in the course of the day.

“Hurry, Adrian, and you, constables, keep all unbidden persons away from these trees, for any place where an oath is taken becomes sacred ground—­The clergymen have seated themselves yonder near the target.  They have the precedence.  Have the kindness to summon them, Herr Van Hout.  Dominie Verstroot wishes to make an address, and then I would like to utter a few words of admonition to the citizens myself.”

Van Hout withdrew, but before he had reached the preachers Junker von Warmond appeared, and reported that a messenger, a handsome young lad, had come as an envoy.  He was standing before the White Gate and had a letter.

“From Valdez?”

“I don’t know; but the young fellow is a Hollander and his face is familiar to me.”

“Conduct him here; but don’t interrupt us until the ceremony of taking the oath is over.  The messenger can tell Valdez what he has seen and heard here.  It will do the Castilian good, to know in advance what we intend.”

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