Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 285 pages of information about The Burgomaster's Wife Complete.

Translated from the German by Mary J. Safford

Baroness Sophie von BRANDENSTEIN, nee Ebers.

My reason for dedicating a book, and particularly this book, to you, the only sister of my dead father, needs no word of explanation between us.  From early childhood you have been a dear and faithful friend to me, and certainly have not forgotten how industriously I labored, while your guest seventeen years ago, in arranging the material which constitutes the foundation of the “Burgomaster’s Wife.”  You then took a friendly interest in many a note of facts, that had seemed to me extraordinary, admirable, or amusing, and when the claims of an arduous profession prevented me from pursuing my favorite occupation of studying the history of Holland, my mother’s home, in the old way, never wearied of reminding me of the fallow material, that had previously awakened your sympathy.

At last I have been permitted to give the matter so long laid aside its just dues.  A beautiful portion of Holland’s glorious history affords the espalier, around which the tendrils of my narrative entwine.  You have watched them grow, and therefore will view them kindly and indulgently.

In love and friendship,

Ever the same,

Georg Ebers

Leipsic, Oct. 30th, 1881.

THE BURGOMASTER’S WIFE.

CHAPTER I.

In the year 1574 A. D. spring made its joyous entry into the Netherlands at an unusually early date.

The sky was blue, gnats sported in the sunshine, white butterflies alighted on the newly-opened yellow flowers, and beside one of the numerous ditches intersecting the wide plain stood a stork, snapping at a fine frog; the poor fellow soon writhed in its enemy’s red beak.  One gulp—­the merry jumper vanished, and its murderer, flapping its wings, soared high into the air.  On flew the bird over gardens filled with blossoming fruit-trees, trimly laid-out flower-beds, and gaily-painted arbors, across the frowning circlet of walls and towers that girdled the city, over narrow houses with high, pointed gables, and neat streets bordered with elm, poplar, linden and willow-trees, decked with the first green leaves of spring.  At last it alighted on a lofty gable-roof, on whose ridge was its firmly-fastened nest.  After generously giving up its prey to the little wife brooding over the eggs, it stood on one leg and gazed thoughtfully down upon the city, whose shining red tiles gleamed spick and span from the green velvet carpet of the meadows.  The bird had known beautiful Leyden, the gem of Holland, for many a year, and was familiar with all the branches of the Rhine that divided the stately city into numerous islands, and over which arched as many stone bridges as there are days in five months of the year; but surely many changes had occurred here since the stork’s last departure for the south.

Follow Us on Facebook