Barbara Blomberg — Volume 08 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 64 pages of information about Barbara Blomberg Volume 08.

CHAPTER V.

Everything in Barbara’s residence had remained as it was when she arrived, only the second story, since the departure of the marquise, had stood empty.  Two horses had been left in the stable, the steward performed his duties as before, the cook presided in the kitchen, and Frau Lamperi attended to Barbara’s rooms.

Nevertheless, at Wolf’s first visit he was obliged to exert all his powers of persuasion to induce his miserable friend to give up her resolution of moving into her former home.  Besides, after the conversation with Charles’s messenger, she had felt so ill that no visitor except himself had been received.

When, a few days later, she learned that the Emperor had set out for Landshut, she entreated Wolf to seek out Pyramus Kogel, for she had just learned that during her illness her father’s travelling companion had asked to see her, but, like every one else, had been refused.  She grieved because they had forgotten to tell her this; but when she discovered that the same stately officer had called again soon after the relapse, she angrily upbraided, for the first time, Frau Lamperi, who was to blame for the neglect, and her grief increased when, on the same day, a messenger brought from the man who had twice been denied admittance a letter which inclosed one from her father, and briefly informed her that he should set out at once for Landshut.  As she would not receive him, he must send her the captain’s messages in this way.

It appeared from the old man’s letter that, while leaving the ship at Antwerp, he had met with an accident, and perhaps might long be prevented from undertaking the toilsome journey home.  But he was well cared for, and if she was still his clear daughter, she must treat Herr Pyramus Kogel kindly this time, for he had proved a faithful son and good Samaritan to him.

A stranger’s hand had written this letter, which contained nothing more about the old soldier’s health, but reminded her of a tin tankard which he had forgotten to deliver, and urged her to care for the ever-burning lamp in the chapel.  It closed with the request to offer his profound reverence at the feet of his Majesty, the most gracious, most glorious, and most powerful Emperor, and the remark that there was much to say about the country of Spain, but the best was certainly when one thought of it after turning the back upon it.

As a postscript, he had written with his own hand, as the crooked letters showed:  “Mind what I told you about Sir Pyramus, without whom you would now be a deserted orphan.  Can you believe that in all Spain there is no fresh butter to be had, either for bread or in the kitchen for roast meat, but instead rancid oil, which we should think just fit for burning?”

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Barbara Blomberg — Volume 08 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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