Barbara Blomberg — Volume 05 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 49 pages of information about Barbara Blomberg Volume 05.

To their own surprise, during this conversation they had reached the Hiltner house, and Erasmus invited his friend to come to his room and over a glass of wine answer him, as he had had the last word.  But Wolf had already drunk at his own home more of the fiery Wurzburg from the precentor’s cellar than usual.  Besides, much as he still had to say in reply to Erasmus, the sensible young man deemed it advisable to avoid the syndic’s house for the present.  The confessor’s suspicion had been aroused, and De Soto was a Dominican, who certainly did not stand far from the Holy Inquisition.

Therefore while Erasmus, with burning head and great excitement, was still urging his friend to come in, Wolf unexpectedly bade him a hasty and resolute farewell.

CHAPTER XXIII.

Wolf left the Hiltner house behind him with the feeling that he had upheld the cause of his Church against the learned opponent to the best of his ability, and had not been defeated.  Yet he was not entirely satisfied.  In former years he had read the Hutten dialogues, and, though he disapproved of their assaults upon the Holy Father in Rome, he had warmly sympathized with the fiery knight’s love for his native land.

Far as, at the court of Charles, the German ranked below the Netherlander, the Spaniard, and the Italian, Wolf was proud of being a German, and it vexed him that he had not at least made the attempt to repel the theologian’s charge that the Catholic, to whom the authority of Rome was the highest, would be inferior to the Protestant in patriotism.

But he would have succeeded no better in convincing Erasmus than the learned theologians who, at the Emperor’s instance, had held an earnest religious discussion in Ratisbon a short time before, had succeeded in arriving at even a remote understanding.

As he reached the Haidplatz new questions of closer interest were casting these of supreme importance into the shade.

He was to enter his home directly, and then the woman whom he loved would rest above him, and alone, unwatched, and unguarded, perhaps dream of another.

Who was the man for whose sake she withdrew from him the heart to whose possession he had the best and at any rate the oldest right?

Certainly not Baron Malfalconnet.

Neither could he believe it to be Peter Schlumperger or young Crafft.

Yet perhaps the fortunate man belonged to the court.  If that was the case, how easy would the game now be made for him with the girl, who was guarded by no faithful eye!

His heart throbbed faster as he entered Red Cock Street.

The moon was still in the cloudless, starry sky, shining with her calm, silver radiance upon one side of the street.  Barbara’s bow-window was touched by it, and—­what did it mean?—­a small lamp must still be burning in her room, for the window was illuminated, though but dimly.  Perhaps she had kept the light because she felt timid in her lonely chamber.  Now Wolf crossed obliquely toward his house.

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Barbara Blomberg — Volume 05 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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