The Bride of the Nile — Complete eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 668 pages of information about The Bride of the Nile Complete.
a whirlpool dragged away the horse, spinning him round, and with him Orion and herself, a shrill blast swept past them, and then the current and the waves, the roaring of the whirlpool, the howling of the storm—­all at once and together, as with one voice, louder than all else and filling her ears, shouted:  “Thou!”—­Only Orion remained speechless.  An eddy caught the horse and sucked him under, a wave carried her away from him, she was sinking, sinking, and stretched out her arms with longing.—­A cold dew stood on her brow as she slept, and the nurse, waking her from her uneasy dream, shook her head as she said: 

“Why, child?  What ails you?  You have been calling Orion again and again, at first in terror and then so tenderly.—­Yes, believe me, tenderly.”

CHAPTER XX.

In the neat rooms which Rufinus’ wife had made ready for her sick guests perfect peace reigned, and it was noon.  A soft twilight fell through the thick green curtains which mitigated the sunshine, and the nurses had lately cleared away after the morning meal.  Paula was moistening the bandage on the Masdakite’s head, and Pulcheria was busy in the adjoining room with Mandane, who obeyed the physician’s instructions with intelligent submission and showed no signs of insanity.

Paula was still spellbound by her past dream.  She was possessed by such unrest that, quite against her wont, she could not long remain quiet, and when Pulcheria came to her to tell her this or that, she listened with so little attention and sympathy that the humble-minded girl, fearing to disturb her, withdrew to her patient’s bed-side and waited quietly till her new divinity called her.

In fact, it was not without reason that Paula gave herself up to a certain anxiety; for, if she was not mistaken, Orion must necessarily present himself to hand over to her the remainder of her fortune; and though even yesterday, on her way from the cemetery, she had said to herself that she must and would refuse to meet him, the excitement produced by Katharina’s story and her subsequent dream had confirmed her in her determination.

Perpetua awaited Orion’s visit on the ground-floor, charged to announce him to Rufinus and not to her mistress.  The old man had willingly undertaken to receive the money as her representative; for Philippus had not concealed from her that he had acquainted him with the circumstances under which Paula had quitted the governor’s house, describing Orion as a man whom she had good reason for desiring to avoid.

By about two hours after noon Paula’s restlessness had increased so much that now and then she wandered out of the sick-room, which looked over the garden, to watch the Nile-quay from the window of the anteroom; for he might arrive by either way.  She never thought of the security of her property; but the question arose in her mind as to whether it were not actually a breach of duty to avoid the agitation it would cost

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The Bride of the Nile — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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