The Bride of the Nile — Complete eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 668 pages of information about The Bride of the Nile Complete.

This worthy official—­a perfectly commonplace man, neither tall nor short, neither old nor young, with a pale, anxious face, furrowed by work and responsibility, but shrewd and finely cut-glanced keenly at the pair, and then proceeded to lay a considerable sum in gold pieces before Paula.  His young master had sent it, in obedience to his deceased father’s wishes, for her immediate needs; the rest, the larger part of her fortune, with a full account, would be given over to her after the Mukaukas was buried.  Nilus could, however, give her an approximate idea of the sum, and it was so considerable that Paula could not believe her ears.  She now saw herself secure against external anxiety, nay, in such ease that she was justified in living at some expense.

Philippus was present throughout the interview, and it cut him to the heart.  It had made him so happy to think that he was all in all to the poor orphan, and could shelter her against pressing want.  He had been prepared to take upon himself the care of providing Paula with the home she had found and everything she could need; and now, as it turned out, his protege was not merely higher in rank than himself, but much richer.

He felt as though Orion’s envoy had robbed him of the best joy in life.  After introducing Paula to her worthy host and his family, he quitted the house of Rufinus with a very crushed aspect.

When night came Perpetua once more enjoyed the privilege of assisting her young mistress to undress; but Paula could not sleep, and when she joined her new friends next morning she told herself that here, if anywhere, was the place where she might recover her lost peace, but that she must still have a hard struggle and a long pilgrimage before she could achieve this.

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     In whom some good quality or other may not be discovered
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THE BRIDE OF THE NILE

By Georg Ebers

Volume 5.

CHAPTER XVII.

During all these hours Orion had been in the solitude of his own rooms.  Next to them was little Mary’s sleeping-room; he had not seen the child again since leaving his father’s death-bed.  He knew that she was lying there in a very feverish state, but he could not so far command himself as to enquire for her.  When, now and again, he could not help thinking of her, he involuntarily clenched his fists.  His soul was shaken to the foundations; desperate, beside himself, incapable of any thought but that he was the most miserable man on earth—­that his father’s curse had blighted him—­that nothing could undo what had happened—­that some cruel and inexorable power had turned his truest friend into a foe and had sundered them so completely that there was no possibility of atonement or of moving him to a word of pardon or a kindly glance—­he

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The Bride of the Nile — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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