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Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 74 pages of information about The Bride of the Nile Volume 08.

CHAPTER V.

After that interview with Orion, Philippus hurried off through the town, paying so little heed to the people he met and to the processions besieging Heaven with loud psalms to let the Nile at last begin to rise, that he ran up against more than one passer-by, and had many a word of abuse shouted after him.  He went into two or three houses, and neither his patients nor their attendants could recognize, in this abrupt and hasty visitor, the physician and friend who was usually so sympathetic to the sufferer:  who would speak with a cordiality that brought new life to his heart, who would toss the children in the air, kiss one and nod merrily to another.  To-day their elders even felt shy and anxious in his presence.  For the first time he found the duty he loved a wearisome burthen; the sick man was a tormenting spirit in league with the world against his peace of mind.  What possessed him, that he should feel such love of his fellow-men as to deprive himself of all comfort in life and of his night’s rest for their sake?  Rufinus was right.  In these times each man lived solely to spite his neighbor, and he who could be most brazenly selfish, looking neither to the right hand nor to the left, was the most certain to get on in life.  Fool that he was to let other folks’ woes destroy his peace and hinder him in his scientific advancement!

Tormented by such bitter thoughts as these, he went into a neat little house by the harbor where a worthy pilot lay dying, surrounded by his wife and children; and there, at once, he was himself again, putting forth all his knowledge and heartfelt kindliness, quitting the scene with a bleeding heart and an empty purse; but no sooner was he out of doors than his former mood closed in upon him with double gloom.  The case was plain:  Even with the fixed determination not to sacrifice himself for others he could not help doing it; the impulse was too strong for him.  He could no more help suffering with the sufferer, and giving the best he had to give with no hope of a return, than the drunkard can help drinking.  He was made to be plundered; it was his fate!

With a drooping head he returned to his old friend’s work-room.  Horapollo was sitting, just as he had sat the night before, at his writing-table with his scrolls and his three lamps, a slave below, snoring while he awaited his master’s pleasure.

The leech’s pretty Greek greeting “Rejoice !” sounded rather like “May you choke!” as he flung aside his upper garment; and to the old man’s answer and anxious exclamation:  “How badly you look, Philip!” he answered crossly:  “Like a man who deserves a kick rather than a welcome; a booby who has submitted to have his nose pulled; a cur who has licked the hand of the lout who has thrashed him!”

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