Cleopatra — Volume 07 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 69 pages of information about Cleopatra Volume 07.

CHAPTER XVII.

Cleopatra had sought the venerable Anubis, who now, as the priest of Alexander, at the age of eighty, ruled the whole hierarchy of the country.  It was difficult for him to leave his arm-chair, but he had been carried to the observatory to examine the adverse result of the observation made by the Queen herself.  The position of the stars, however, had been so unfavourable that the more deeply Cleopatra entered into these matters, the less easy he found it to urge the mitigating influences of distant planets, which he had at first pointed out.

In his reception-hall, however, the chief priest had assured her that the independence of Egypt and the safety of her own person lay in her hands; only—­the planets showed this—­a terrible sacrifice was required—­a sacrifice of which his dignity, his eighty years, and his love for her alike forbade him to speak.  Cleopatra was accustomed to hear these mysterious sayings from his lips, and interpreted them in her own way.  Many motives had induced her to seek the venerable prelate at this late hour.  In difficult situations he had often aided her with good counsel; but this time she was not led to him by the magic cup of Nektanebus, which the eight pastophori who accompanied it had that day restored to the temple, for since the battle of Actium the superb vessel had been a source of constant anxiety to her.

Cleopatra had now asked the teacher of her childhood the direct question whether the cup—­a wide, shallow vessel, with a flat, polished bottom could really have induced Antony to leave the battle and follow her ere the victory was decided.  She had used it just before the conflict between the galleys, and this circumstance led Anubis to answer positively in the affirmative.

Long ago the marvellous chalice had been exhibited to her among the temple treasures, and she was told that every one who induced another person to be reflected from its shining surface obtained the mastery over his will.  Her wish to possess it, however, was not gratified, and she did not ask for it again until the limitless devotion and ardent love of Antony had seemed less fervent than of yore.  From that time she had never ceased to urge her aged friend to place the wondrous cup in her keeping.  At first he had absolutely refused, predicting that its use would bring misfortune upon her; but when her request was followed by an imperative command, and the goblet was entrusted to her, Anubis himself believed that this one vessel did possess the magic power attributed to it.  He deemed that the drinking-cup afforded the strongest proof of the magic art, far transcending human ability, of the great goddess by whose aid King Nektanebus—­who, according to tradition, was the father of Alexander the Great—­was said to have made the vessel in the Isis island of Philoe.

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Cleopatra — Volume 07 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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