Cleopatra — Volume 07 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 69 pages of information about Cleopatra Volume 07.

CHAPTER XV.

Charmain went towards her own apartments.  How often she had had a similar experience!  In the midst of the warmest admiration for this rare woman’s depth of feeling, masculine strength of intellect, tireless industry, watchful care for her native land, steadfast loyalty, and maternal devotion, she had been sobered in the most pitiable way.

She had been forced to see Cleopatra, for the sake of realizing a childish dream, and impressing her lover, squander vast sums, which diminished the prosperity of her subjects; place great and important matters below the vain, punctilious care of her own person; forget, in petty jealousy, the justice and kindness which were marked traits in her character; and, though the most kindly and womanly of sovereigns, suffer herself to be urged by angry excitement to inflict outrage on a subject whose acts had awakened her displeasure.  The lofty ambition which had inspired her noblest and most praiseworthy deeds had more than once been the source of acts which she herself regretted.  When a child, she could not endure to be surpassed in difficult tasks, and still deemed it a necessity to be first and peerless.  Hence the unfortunate circumstance that Antony had given Barine the counterpart of an armlet which she herself wore as a gift from her lover, was perhaps the principal cause of her bitter resentment against the hapless woman.

Charmian had seen Cleopatra forgive freely and generously many a wrong, nay, many an affront, inflicted upon her; but to see herself placed by her husband on the same plane as a Barine, even in the most trivial matter, might easily seem to her an unbearable insult; and the mishap which had befallen Caesarion, in consequence of his foolish passion for the young beauty, gave her a right to punish her rival.

Deeply anxious concerning the fate of the woman in her care—­greatly agitated, moreover, and exhausted physically and mentally—­Charmian sought her own apartments.

Here she hoped to find solace in Barine’s cheerful and equable nature; here the helpful hands of her dark-skinned maid and confidante awaited her.

The sun was low in the western horizon when she entered the anteroom.  The members of the body-guard who were on duty told her that nothing unusual had occurred, and with a sigh of relief she passed into the sitting-room.

But the Ethiopian, who usually came to meet her with words of welcome, took her veil and wraps, and removed her shoes, was absent.  Today no one greeted her.  Not until she entered the second room, which she had assigned to her guest, did she find Barine, who was weeping bitterly.

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Cleopatra — Volume 07 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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