Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 551 pages of information about Uarda .

With these words he threw the letter so vehemently on to the table, that it slipped off on to the floor.

The mute slave picked it up, and laid it carefully on the table again, while his master threw a ball into a silver bason.

Several attendants rushed into the room, and Ani ordered them to bring to him the captive dwarf of the Lady Katuti.  His soul rose in indignation against the king, who in his remote camp-tent could fancy he had made him happy by a proof of his highest favor.  When we are plotting against a man we are inclined to regard him as an enemy, and if he offers us a rose we believe it to be for the sake, not of the perfume, but of the thorns.

The dwarf Nemu was brought before the Regent and threw himself on the ground at his feet.

Ani ordered the attendants to leave him, and said to the little man

“You compelled me to put you in prison.  Stand up!” The dwarf rose and said, “Be thanked—­for my arrest too.”

The Regent looked at him in astonishment; but Nemu went on half humbly, half in fun, “I feared for my life, but thou hast not only not shortened it, but hast prolonged it; for in the solitude of the dungeon time seemed long, and the minutes grown to hours.”

“Keep your wit for the ladies,” replied the Regent.  “Did I not know that you meant well, and acted in accordance with the Lady Katuti’s fancy, I would send you to the quarries.”

“My hands,” mumbled the dwarf, “could only break stones for a game of draughts; but my tongue is like the water, which makes one peasant rich, and carries away the fields of another.”

“We shall know how to dam it up.”

“For my lady and for thee it will always flow the right way,” said the dwarf.  “I showed the complaining citizens who it is that slaughters their flesh and blood, and from whom to look for peace and content.  I poured caustic into their wounds, and praised the physician.”

“But unasked and recklessly,” interrupted Ani; “otherwise you have shown yourself capable, and I am willing to spare you for a future time.  But overbusy friends are more damaging than intelligent enemies.  When I need your services I will call for you.  Till then avoid speech.  Now go to your mistress, and carry to Katuti this letter which has arrived for her.”

“Hail to Ani, the son of the Sun!” cried the dwarf kissing the Regent’s foot.  “Have I no letter to carry to my mistress Nefert?”

“Greet her from me,” replied the Regent.  “Tell Katuti I will visit her after the next meal.  The king’s charioteer has not written, yet I hear that he is well.  Go now, and be silent and discreet.”

The dwarf quitted the room, and Ani went into an airy hall, in which his luxurious meal was laid out, consisting of many dishes prepared with special care.  His appetite was gone, but he tasted of every dish, and gave the steward, who attended on him, his opinion of each.

Follow Us on Facebook