Uarda : a Romance of Ancient Egypt — Volume 03 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 65 pages of information about Uarda .

CHAPTER IX.

It was noon:  the rays of the sun found no way into the narrow shady streets of the city of Thebes, but they blazed with scorching heat on the broad dyke-road which led to the king’s castle, and which at this hour was usually almost deserted.

To-day it was thronged with foot-passengers and chariots, with riders and litter-bearers.

Here and there negroes poured water on the road out of skins, but the dust was so deep, that, in spite of this, it shrouded the streets and the passengers in a dry cloud, which extended not only over the city, but down to the harbor where the boats of the inhabitants of the Necropolis landed their freight.

The city of the Pharaohs was in unwonted agitation, for the storm-swift breath of rumor had spread some news which excited both alarm and hope in the huts of the poor as well as in the palaces of the great.

In the early morning three mounted messengers had arrived from the king’s camp with heavy letter-bags, and had dismounted at the Regent’s palace.

     [The Egyptians were great letter-writers, and many of their letters
     have come down to us, they also had established postmen, and had a
     word for them in their language “fai chat.”]

As after a long drought the inhabitants of a village gaze up at the black thunder-cloud that gathers above their heads promising the refreshing rain—­but that may also send the kindling lightning-flash or the destroying hail-storm—­so the hopes and the fears of the citizens were centred on the news which came but rarely and at irregular intervals from the scene of war; for there was scarcely a house in the huge city which had not sent a father, a son, or a relative to the fighting hosts of the king in the distant northeast.

And though the couriers from the camp were much oftener the heralds of tears than of joy; though the written rolls which they brought told more often of death and wounds than of promotion, royal favors, and conquered spoil, yet they were expected with soul-felt longing and received with shouts of joy.

Great and small hurried after their arrival to the Regent’s palace, and the scribes—­who distributed the letters and read the news which was intended for public communication, and the lists of those who had fallen or perished—­were closely besieged with enquirers.

Man has nothing harder to endure than uncertainty, and generally, when in suspense, looks forward to bad rather than to good news.  And the bearers of ill ride faster than the messengers of weal.

The Regent Ani resided in a building adjoining the king’s palace.  His business-quarters surrounded an immensely wide court, and consisted of a great number of rooms opening on to this court, in which numerous scribes worked with their chief.  On the farther side was a large, veranda-like hall open at the front, with a roof supported by pillars.

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Project Gutenberg
Uarda : a Romance of Ancient Egypt — Volume 03 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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