Uarda : a Romance of Ancient Egypt — Volume 01 eBook

Georg Ebers
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 59 pages of information about Uarda .

“You will pay me, will you, to let you off!  Do you think I will let your tricks pass?  You little know this old man.  I will complain to the Gods, not to the school-master; and as for your wine, youngster, I will offer it as a libation, that heaven may forgive you.”

CHAPTER II.

The temple where, in the fore-court, Paaker was waiting, and where the priest had disappeared to call the leech, was called the “House of Seti” —­[It is still standing and known as the temple of Qurnah.]—­and was one of the largest in the City of the Dead.  Only that magnificent building of the time of the deposed royal race of the reigning king’s grandfather —­that temple which had been founded by Thotmes III., and whose gate-way Amenophis III. had adorned with immense colossal statues—­[That which stands to the north is the famous musical statue, or Pillar of Memmon]—­ exceeded it in the extent of its plan; in every other respect it held the pre-eminence among the sanctuaries of the Necropolis.  Rameses I. had founded it shortly after he succeeded in seizing the Egyptian throne; and his yet greater son Seti carried on the erection, in which the service of the dead for the Manes of the members of the new royal family was conducted, and the high festivals held in honor of the Gods of the under-world.  Great sums had been expended for its establishment, for the maintenance of the priesthood of its sanctuary, and the support of the institutions connected with it.  These were intended to be equal to the great original foundations of priestly learning at Heliopolis and Memphis; they were regulated on the same pattern, and with the object of raising the new royal residence of Upper Egypt, namely Thebes, above the capitals of Lower Egypt in regard to philosophical distinction.

One of the most important of these foundations was a very celebrated school of learning.

     [Every detail of this description of an Egyptian school is derived
     from sources dating from the reign of Rameses II. and his
     successor, Merneptah.]

First there was the high-school, in which priests, physicians, judges, mathematicians, astronomers, grammarians, and other learned men, not only had the benefit of instruction, but, subsequently, when they had won admission to the highest ranks of learning, and attained the dignity of “Scribes,” were maintained at the cost of the king, and enabled to pursue their philosophical speculations and researches, in freedom from all care, and in the society of fellow-workers of equal birth and identical interests.

An extensive library, in which thousands of papyrus-rolls were preserved, and to which a manufactory of papyrus was attached, was at the disposal of the learned; and some of them were intrusted with the education of the younger disciples, who had been prepared in the elementary school, which was also dependent on the House—­or university—­of Seti.  The lower school was open to every son of a free citizen, and was often frequented by several hundred boys, who also found night-quarters there.  The parents were of course required either to pay for their maintenance, or to send due supplies of provisions for the keep of their children at school.

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Uarda : a Romance of Ancient Egypt — Volume 01 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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