The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 91 pages of information about The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace.

VII.

O SAEPE Mecum.

O, Oft with me in troublous time
Involved, when Brutus warr’d in Greece,
Who gives you back to your own clime
And your own gods, a man of peace,
Pompey, the earliest friend I knew,
With whom I oft cut short the hours
With wine, my hair bright bathed in dew
Of Syrian oils, and wreathed with flowers? 
With you I shared Philippi’s rout,
Unseemly parted from my shield,
When Valour fell, and warriors stout
Were tumbled on the inglorious field: 
But I was saved by Mercury,
Wrapp’d in thick mist, yet trembling sore,
While you to that tempestuous sea
Were swept by battle’s tide once more. 
Come, pay to Jove the feast you owe;
Lay down those limbs, with warfare spent,
Beneath my laurel; nor be slow
To drain my cask; for you ’twas meant. 
Lethe’s true draught is Massic wine;
Fill high the goblet; pour out free
Rich streams of unguent.  Who will twine
The hasty wreath from myrtle-tree
Or parsley?  Whom will Venus seat
Chairman of cups?  Are Bacchants sane? 
Then I’ll be sober.  O, ’tis sweet
To fool, when friends come home again!

VIII.

ULLA si Juris.

Had chastisement for perjured truth,
Barine, mark’d you with a curse—­
Did one wry nail, or one black tooth,
But make you worse—­
I’d trust you; but, when plighted lies
Have pledged you deepest, lovelier far
You sparkle forth, of all young eyes
The ruling star. 
’Tis gain to mock your mother’s bones,
And night’s still signs, and all the sky,
And gods, that on their glorious thrones
Chill Death defy. 
Ay, Venus smiles; the pure nymphs smile,
And Cupid, tyrant-lord of hearts,
Sharpening on bloody stone the while
His fiery darts. 
New captives fill the nets you weave;
New slaves are bred; and those before,
Though oft they threaten, never leave
Your godless door. 
The mother dreads you for her son,
The thrifty sire, the new-wed bride,
Lest, lured by you, her precious one
Should leave her side.

IX.

Non semper IMBRES.

The rain, it rains not every day
On the soak’d meads; the Caspian main
Not always feels the unequal sway
Of storms, nor on Armenia’s plain,
Dear Valgius, lies the cold dull snow
Through all the year; nor northwinds keen
Upon Garganian oakwoods blow,
And strip the ashes of their green. 
You still with tearful tones pursue
Your lost, lost Mystes; Hesper sees
Your passion when he brings the dew,
And when before the sun he flees. 
Yet not for loved Antilochus
Grey Nestor wasted all his years
In grief; nor o’er young Troilus
His parents’ and his sisters’ tears

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The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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