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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

Archer did not really believe this.  Little as he had actually seen of Madame Olenska, he was beginning to think that he could read her face, and if not her face, her voice; and both had betrayed annoyance, and even dismay, at Beaufort’s sudden appearance.  But, after all, if this were the case, was it not worse than if she had left New York for the express purpose of meeting him?  If she had done that, she ceased to be an object of interest, she threw in her lot with the vulgarest of dissemblers:  a woman engaged in a love affair with Beaufort “classed” herself irretrievably.

No, it was worse a thousand times if, judging Beaufort, and probably despising him, she was yet drawn to him by all that gave him an advantage over the other men about her:  his habit of two continents and two societies, his familiar association with artists and actors and people generally in the world’s eye, and his careless contempt for local prejudices.  Beaufort was vulgar, he was uneducated, he was purse-proud; but the circumstances of his life, and a certain native shrewdness, made him better worth talking to than many men, morally and socially his betters, whose horizon was bounded by the Battery and the Central Park.  How should any one coming from a wider world not feel the difference and be attracted by it?

Madame Olenska, in a burst of irritation, had said to Archer that he and she did not talk the same language; and the young man knew that in some respects this was true.  But Beaufort understood every turn of her dialect, and spoke it fluently:  his view of life, his tone, his attitude, were merely a coarser reflection of those revealed in Count Olenski’s letter.  This might seem to be to his disadvantage with Count Olenski’s wife; but Archer was too intelligent to think that a young woman like Ellen Olenska would necessarily recoil from everything that reminded her of her past.  She might believe herself wholly in revolt against it; but what had charmed her in it would still charm her, even though it were against her will.

Thus, with a painful impartiality, did the young man make out the case for Beaufort, and for Beaufort’s victim.  A longing to enlighten her was strong in him; and there were moments when he imagined that all she asked was to be enlightened.

That evening he unpacked his books from London.  The box was full of things he had been waiting for impatiently; a new volume of Herbert Spencer, another collection of the prolific Alphonse Daudet’s brilliant tales, and a novel called “Middlemarch,” as to which there had lately been interesting things said in the reviews.  He had declined three dinner invitations in favour of this feast; but though he turned the pages with the sensuous joy of the book-lover, he did not know what he was reading, and one book after another dropped from his hand.  Suddenly, among them, he lit on a small volume of verse which he had ordered because the name had attracted him: 

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