The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

Beaufort had entered the little house with his usual easy assurance; but he could not smile away the vertical line between his eyes.  It was fairly clear that Madame Olenska had not known that he was coming, though her words to Archer had hinted at the possibility; at any rate, she had evidently not told him where she was going when she left New York, and her unexplained departure had exasperated him.  The ostensible reason of his appearance was the discovery, the very night before, of a “perfect little house,” not in the market, which was really just the thing for her, but would be snapped up instantly if she didn’t take it; and he was loud in mock-reproaches for the dance she had led him in running away just as he had found it.

“If only this new dodge for talking along a wire had been a little bit nearer perfection I might have told you all this from town, and been toasting my toes before the club fire at this minute, instead of tramping after you through the snow,” he grumbled, disguising a real irritation under the pretence of it; and at this opening Madame Olenska twisted the talk away to the fantastic possibility that they might one day actually converse with each other from street to street, or even—­ incredible dream!—­from one town to another.  This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.

Mrs. van der Luyden had not yet returned; and Archer took his leave and walked off to fetch the cutter, while Beaufort followed the Countess Olenska indoors.  It was probable that, little as the van der Luydens encouraged unannounced visits, he could count on being asked to dine, and sent back to the station to catch the nine o’clock train; but more than that he would certainly not get, for it would be inconceivable to his hosts that a gentleman travelling without luggage should wish to spend the night, and distasteful to them to propose it to a person with whom they were on terms of such limited cordiality as Beaufort.

Beaufort knew all this, and must have foreseen it; and his taking the long journey for so small a reward gave the measure of his impatience.  He was undeniably in pursuit of the Countess Olenska; and Beaufort had only one object in view in his pursuit of pretty women.  His dull and childless home had long since palled on him; and in addition to more permanent consolations he was always in quest of amorous adventures in his own set.  This was the man from whom Madame Olenska was avowedly flying:  the question was whether she had fled because his importunities displeased her, or because she did not wholly trust herself to resist them; unless, indeed, all her talk of flight had been a blind, and her departure no more than a manoeuvre.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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