The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“Do you think,” she asked, glancing toward the stage, “he will send her a bunch of yellow roses tomorrow morning?”

Archer reddened, and his heart gave a leap of surprise.  He had called only twice on Madame Olenska, and each time he had sent her a box of yellow roses, and each time without a card.  She had never before made any allusion to the flowers, and he supposed she had never thought of him as the sender.  Now her sudden recognition of the gift, and her associating it with the tender leave-taking on the stage, filled him with an agitated pleasure.

“I was thinking of that too—­I was going to leave the theatre in order to take the picture away with me,” he said.

To his surprise her colour rose, reluctantly and duskily.  She looked down at the mother-of-pearl opera-glass in her smoothly gloved hands, and said, after a pause:  “What do you do while May is away?”

“I stick to my work,” he answered, faintly annoyed by the question.

In obedience to a long-established habit, the Wellands had left the previous week for St. Augustine, where, out of regard for the supposed susceptibility of Mr. Welland’s bronchial tubes, they always spent the latter part of the winter.  Mr. Welland was a mild and silent man, with no opinions but with many habits.  With these habits none might interfere; and one of them demanded that his wife and daughter should always go with him on his annual journey to the south.  To preserve an unbroken domesticity was essential to his peace of mind; he would not have known where his hair-brushes were, or how to provide stamps for his letters, if Mrs. Welland had not been there to tell him.

As all the members of the family adored each other, and as Mr. Welland was the central object of their idolatry, it never occurred to his wife and May to let him go to St. Augustine alone; and his sons, who were both in the law, and could not leave New York during the winter, always joined him for Easter and travelled back with him.

It was impossible for Archer to discuss the necessity of May’s accompanying her father.  The reputation of the Mingotts’ family physician was largely based on the attack of pneumonia which Mr. Welland had never had; and his insistence on St. Augustine was therefore inflexible.  Originally, it had been intended that May’s engagement should not be announced till her return from Florida, and the fact that it had been made known sooner could not be expected to alter Mr. Welland’s plans.  Archer would have liked to join the travellers and have a few weeks of sunshine and boating with his betrothed; but he too was bound by custom and conventions.  Little arduous as his professional duties were, he would have been convicted of frivolity by the whole Mingott clan if he had suggested asking for a holiday in mid-winter; and he accepted May’s departure with the resignation which he perceived would have to be one of the principal constituents of married life.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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