The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“My dear sir—­” he always addressed Archer as “sir”—­“I have sent for you to go into a little matter; a matter which, for the moment, I prefer not to mention either to Mr. Skipworth or Mr. Redwood.”  The gentlemen he spoke of were the other senior partners of the firm; for, as was always the case with legal associations of old standing in New York, all the partners named on the office letter-head were long since dead; and Mr. Letterblair, for example, was, professionally speaking, his own grandson.

He leaned back in his chair with a furrowed brow.  “For family reasons—­” he continued.

Archer looked up.

“The Mingott family,” said Mr. Letterblair with an explanatory smile and bow.  “Mrs. Manson Mingott sent for me yesterday.  Her grand-daughter the Countess Olenska wishes to sue her husband for divorce.  Certain papers have been placed in my hands.”  He paused and drummed on his desk.  “In view of your prospective alliance with the family I should like to consult you—­to consider the case with you—­before taking any farther steps.”

Archer felt the blood in his temples.  He had seen the Countess Olenska only once since his visit to her, and then at the Opera, in the Mingott box.  During this interval she had become a less vivid and importunate image, receding from his foreground as May Welland resumed her rightful place in it.  He had not heard her divorce spoken of since Janey’s first random allusion to it, and had dismissed the tale as unfounded gossip.  Theoretically, the idea of divorce was almost as distasteful to him as to his mother; and he was annoyed that Mr. Letterblair (no doubt prompted by old Catherine Mingott) should be so evidently planning to draw him into the affair.  After all, there were plenty of Mingott men for such jobs, and as yet he was not even a Mingott by marriage.

He waited for the senior partner to continue.  Mr. Letterblair unlocked a drawer and drew out a packet.  “If you will run your eye over these papers—­”

Archer frowned.  “I beg your pardon, sir; but just because of the prospective relationship, I should prefer your consulting Mr. Skipworth or Mr. Redwood.”

Mr. Letterblair looked surprised and slightly offended.  It was unusual for a junior to reject such an opening.

He bowed.  “I respect your scruple, sir; but in this case I believe true delicacy requires you to do as I ask.  Indeed, the suggestion is not mine but Mrs. Manson Mingott’s and her son’s.  I have seen Lovell Mingott; and also Mr. Welland.  They all named you.”

Archer felt his temper rising.  He had been somewhat languidly drifting with events for the last fortnight, and letting May’s fair looks and radiant nature obliterate the rather importunate pressure of the Mingott claims.  But this behest of old Mrs. Mingott’s roused him to a sense of what the clan thought they had the right to exact from a prospective son-in-law; and he chafed at the role.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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