The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

The day was delectable.  The bare vaulting of trees along the Mall was ceiled with lapis lazuli, and arched above snow that shone like splintered crystals.  It was the weather to call out May’s radiance, and she burned like a young maple in the frost.  Archer was proud of the glances turned on her, and the simple joy of possessorship cleared away his underlying perplexities.

“It’s so delicious—­waking every morning to smell lilies-of-the-valley in one’s room!” she said.

“Yesterday they came late.  I hadn’t time in the morning—­”

“But your remembering each day to send them makes me love them so much more than if you’d given a standing order, and they came every morning on the minute, like one’s music-teacher—­as I know Gertrude Lefferts’s did, for instance, when she and Lawrence were engaged.”

“Ah—­they would!” laughed Archer, amused at her keenness.  He looked sideways at her fruit-like cheek and felt rich and secure enough to add:  “When I sent your lilies yesterday afternoon I saw some rather gorgeous yellow roses and packed them off to Madame Olenska.  Was that right?”

“How dear of you!  Anything of that kind delights her.  It’s odd she didn’t mention it:  she lunched with us today, and spoke of Mr. Beaufort’s having sent her wonderful orchids, and cousin Henry van der Luyden a whole hamper of carnations from Skuytercliff.  She seems so surprised to receive flowers.  Don’t people send them in Europe?  She thinks it such a pretty custom.”

“Oh, well, no wonder mine were overshadowed by Beaufort’s,” said Archer irritably.  Then he remembered that he had not put a card with the roses, and was vexed at having spoken of them.  He wanted to say:  “I called on your cousin yesterday,” but hesitated.  If Madame Olenska had not spoken of his visit it might seem awkward that he should.  Yet not to do so gave the affair an air of mystery that he disliked.  To shake off the question he began to talk of their own plans, their future, and Mrs. Welland’s insistence on a long engagement.

“If you call it long!  Isabel Chivers and Reggie were engaged for two years:  Grace and Thorley for nearly a year and a half.  Why aren’t we very well off as we are?”

It was the traditional maidenly interrogation, and he felt ashamed of himself for finding it singularly childish.  No doubt she simply echoed what was said for her; but she was nearing her twenty-second birthday, and he wondered at what age “nice” women began to speak for themselves.

“Never, if we won’t let them, I suppose,” he mused, and recalled his mad outburst to Mr. Sillerton Jackson:  “Women ought to be as free as we are—­”

It would presently be his task to take the bandage from this young woman’s eyes, and bid her look forth on the world.  But how many generations of the women who had gone to her making had descended bandaged to the family vault?  He shivered a little, remembering some of the new ideas in his scientific books, and the much-cited instance of the Kentucky cave-fish, which had ceased to develop eyes because they had no use for them.  What if, when he had bidden May Welland to open hers, they could only look out blankly at blankness?

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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