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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

It was always an interesting occasion when a young pair launched their first invitations in the third person, and their summons was seldom refused even by the seasoned and sought-after.  Still, it was admittedly a triumph that the van der Luydens, at May’s request, should have stayed over in order to be present at her farewell dinner for the Countess Olenska.

The two mothers-in-law sat in May’s drawing-room on the afternoon of the great day, Mrs. Archer writing out the menus on Tiffany’s thickest gilt-edged bristol, while Mrs. Welland superintended the placing of the palms and standard lamps.

Archer, arriving late from his office, found them still there.  Mrs. Archer had turned her attention to the name-cards for the table, and Mrs. Welland was considering the effect of bringing forward the large gilt sofa, so that another “corner” might be created between the piano and the window.

May, they told him, was in the dining-room inspecting the mound of Jacqueminot roses and maidenhair in the centre of the long table, and the placing of the Maillard bonbons in openwork silver baskets between the candelabra.  On the piano stood a large basket of orchids which Mr. van der Luyden had had sent from Skuytercliff.  Everything was, in short, as it should be on the approach of so considerable an event.

Mrs. Archer ran thoughtfully over the list, checking off each name with her sharp gold pen.

“Henry van der Luyden—­Louisa—­the Lovell Mingotts —­the Reggie Chiverses—­Lawrence Lefferts and Gertrude—­(yes, I suppose May was right to have them)—­the Selfridge Merrys, Sillerton Jackson, Van Newland and his wife. (How time passes!  It seems only yesterday that he was your best man, Newland)—­and Countess Olenska—­yes, I think that’s all. . . .”

Mrs. Welland surveyed her son-in-law affectionately.  “No one can say, Newland, that you and May are not giving Ellen a handsome send-off.”

“Ah, well,” said Mrs. Archer, “I understand May’s wanting her cousin to tell people abroad that we’re not quite barbarians.”

“I’m sure Ellen will appreciate it.  She was to arrive this morning, I believe.  It will make a most charming last impression.  The evening before sailing is usually so dreary,” Mrs. Welland cheerfully continued.

Archer turned toward the door, and his mother-in-law called to him:  “Do go in and have a peep at the table.  And don’t let May tire herself too much.”  But he affected not to hear, and sprang up the stairs to his library.  The room looked at him like an alien countenance composed into a polite grimace; and he perceived that it had been ruthlessly “tidied,” and prepared, by a judicious distribution of ash-trays and cedar-wood boxes, for the gentlemen to smoke in.

“Ah, well,” he thought, “it’s not for long—­” and he went on to his dressing-room.

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