The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“M’ama!” thrilled out the triumphant Marguerite; and the occupants of the box looked up in surprise at Archer’s entrance.  He had already broken one of the rules of his world, which forbade the entering of a box during a solo.

Slipping between Mr. van der Luyden and Sillerton Jackson, he leaned over his wife.

“I’ve got a beastly headache; don’t tell any one, but come home, won’t you?” he whispered.

May gave him a glance of comprehension, and he saw her whisper to his mother, who nodded sympathetically; then she murmured an excuse to Mrs. van der Luyden, and rose from her seat just as Marguerite fell into Faust’s arms.  Archer, while he helped her on with her Opera cloak, noticed the exchange of a significant smile between the older ladies.

As they drove away May laid her hand shyly on his.  “I’m so sorry you don’t feel well.  I’m afraid they’ve been overworking you again at the office.”

“No—­it’s not that:  do you mind if I open the window?” he returned confusedly, letting down the pane on his side.  He sat staring out into the street, feeling his wife beside him as a silent watchful interrogation, and keeping his eyes steadily fixed on the passing houses.  At their door she caught her skirt in the step of the carriage, and fell against him.

“Did you hurt yourself?” he asked, steadying her with his arm.

“No; but my poor dress—­see how I’ve torn it!” she exclaimed.  She bent to gather up a mud-stained breadth, and followed him up the steps into the hall.  The servants had not expected them so early, and there was only a glimmer of gas on the upper landing.

Archer mounted the stairs, turned up the light, and put a match to the brackets on each side of the library mantelpiece.  The curtains were drawn, and the warm friendly aspect of the room smote him like that of a familiar face met during an unavowable errand.

He noticed that his wife was very pale, and asked if he should get her some brandy.

“Oh, no,” she exclaimed with a momentary flush, as she took off her cloak.  “But hadn’t you better go to bed at once?” she added, as he opened a silver box on the table and took out a cigarette.

Archer threw down the cigarette and walked to his usual place by the fire.

“No; my head is not as bad as that.”  He paused.  “And there’s something I want to say; something important—­that I must tell you at once.”

She had dropped into an armchair, and raised her head as he spoke.  “Yes, dear?” she rejoined, so gently that he wondered at the lack of wonder with which she received this preamble.

“May—­” he began, standing a few feet from her chair, and looking over at her as if the slight distance between them were an unbridgeable abyss.  The sound of his voice echoed uncannily through the homelike hush, and he repeated:  “There is something I’ve got to tell you . . . about myself . . .”

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Project Gutenberg
The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.