The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

The answer checked the pleading on Archer’s lips:  it seemed to come from depths of experience beyond his reach.  The slow advance of the ferry-boat had ceased, and her bows bumped against the piles of the slip with a violence that made the brougham stagger, and flung Archer and Madame Olenska against each other.  The young man, trembling, felt the pressure of her shoulder, and passed his arm about her.

“If you’re not blind, then, you must see that this can’t last.”

“What can’t?”

“Our being together—­and not together.”

“No.  You ought not to have come today,” she said in an altered voice; and suddenly she turned, flung her arms about him and pressed her lips to his.  At the same moment the carriage began to move, and a gas-lamp at the head of the slip flashed its light into the window.  She drew away, and they sat silent and motionless while the brougham struggled through the congestion of carriages about the ferry-landing.  As they gained the street Archer began to speak hurriedly.

“Don’t be afraid of me:  you needn’t squeeze yourself back into your corner like that.  A stolen kiss isn’t what I want.  Look:  I’m not even trying to touch the sleeve of your jacket.  Don’t suppose that I don’t understand your reasons for not wanting to let this feeling between us dwindle into an ordinary hole-and-corner love-affair.  I couldn’t have spoken like this yesterday, because when we’ve been apart, and I’m looking forward to seeing you, every thought is burnt up in a great flame.  But then you come; and you’re so much more than I remembered, and what I want of you is so much more than an hour or two every now and then, with wastes of thirsty waiting between, that I can sit perfectly still beside you, like this, with that other vision in my mind, just quietly trusting to it to come true.”

For a moment she made no reply; then she asked, hardly above a whisper:  “What do you mean by trusting to it to come true?”

“Why—­you know it will, don’t you?”

“Your vision of you and me together?” She burst into a sudden hard laugh.  “You choose your place well to put it to me!”

“Do you mean because we’re in my wife’s brougham?  Shall we get out and walk, then?  I don’t suppose you mind a little snow?”

She laughed again, more gently.  “No; I shan’t get out and walk, because my business is to get to Granny’s as quickly as I can.  And you’ll sit beside me, and we’ll look, not at visions, but at realities.”

“I don’t know what you mean by realities.  The only reality to me is this.”

She met the words with a long silence, during which the carriage rolled down an obscure side-street and then turned into the searching illumination of Fifth Avenue.

“Is it your idea, then, that I should live with you as your mistress—­since I can’t be your wife?” she asked.

The crudeness of the question startled him:  the word was one that women of his class fought shy of, even when their talk flitted closest about the topic.  He noticed that Madame Olenska pronounced it as if it had a recognised place in her vocabulary, and he wondered if it had been used familiarly in her presence in the horrible life she had fled from.  Her question pulled him up with a jerk, and he floundered.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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