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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

The next day Mrs. Manson Mingott was much better:  she recovered her voice sufficiently to give orders that no one should mention the Beauforts to her again, and asked—­when Dr. Bencomb appeared—­what in the world her family meant by making such a fuss about her health.

“If people of my age will eat chicken-salad in the evening what are they to expect?” she enquired; and, the doctor having opportunely modified her dietary, the stroke was transformed into an attack of indigestion.  But in spite of her firm tone old Catherine did not wholly recover her former attitude toward life.  The growing remoteness of old age, though it had not diminished her curiosity about her neighbours, had blunted her never very lively compassion for their troubles; and she seemed to have no difficulty in putting the Beaufort disaster out of her mind.  But for the first time she became absorbed in her own symptoms, and began to take a sentimental interest in certain members of her family to whom she had hitherto been contemptuously indifferent.

Mr. Welland, in particular, had the privilege of attracting her notice.  Of her sons-in-law he was the one she had most consistently ignored; and all his wife’s efforts to represent him as a man of forceful character and marked intellectual ability (if he had only “chosen”) had been met with a derisive chuckle.  But his eminence as a valetudinarian now made him an object of engrossing interest, and Mrs. Mingott issued an imperial summons to him to come and compare diets as soon as his temperature permitted; for old Catherine was now the first to recognise that one could not be too careful about temperatures.

Twenty-four hours after Madame Olenska’s summons a telegram announced that she would arrive from Washington on the evening of the following day.  At the Wellands’, where the Newland Archers chanced to be lunching, the question as to who should meet her at Jersey City was immediately raised; and the material difficulties amid which the Welland household struggled as if it had been a frontier outpost, lent animation to the debate.  It was agreed that Mrs. Welland could not possibly go to Jersey City because she was to accompany her husband to old Catherine’s that afternoon, and the brougham could not be spared, since, if Mr. Welland were “upset” by seeing his mother-in-law for the first time after her attack, he might have to be taken home at a moment’s notice.  The Welland sons would of course be “down town,” Mr. Lovell Mingott would be just hurrying back from his shooting, and the Mingott carriage engaged in meeting him; and one could not ask May, at the close of a winter afternoon, to go alone across the ferry to Jersey City, even in her own carriage.  Nevertheless, it might appear inhospitable —­and contrary to old Catherine’s express wishes—­if Madame Olenska were allowed to arrive without any of the family being at the station to receive her.  It was just like Ellen, Mrs. Welland’s tired voice implied, to place the family in such a dilemma.  “It’s always one thing after another,” the poor lady grieved, in one of her rare revolts against fate; “the only thing that makes me think Mamma must be less well than Dr. Bencomb will admit is this morbid desire to have Ellen come at once, however inconvenient it is to meet her.”

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