The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“Why?” he questioned.

Lefferts, who was known to shrink from discussion, raised his eye-brows with an ironic grimace that warned the other of the watching damsel behind the lattice.  Nothing could be worse “form” the look reminded Archer, than any display of temper in a public place.

Archer had never been more indifferent to the requirements of form; but his impulse to do Lawrence Lefferts a physical injury was only momentary.  The idea of bandying Ellen Olenska’s name with him at such a time, and on whatsoever provocation, was unthinkable.  He paid for his telegram, and the two young men went out together into the street.  There Archer, having regained his self-control, went on:  “Mrs. Mingott is much better:  the doctor feels no anxiety whatever”; and Lefferts, with profuse expressions of relief, asked him if he had heard that there were beastly bad rumours again about Beaufort. . . .

That afternoon the announcement of the Beaufort failure was in all the papers.  It overshadowed the report of Mrs. Manson Mingott’s stroke, and only the few who had heard of the mysterious connection between the two events thought of ascribing old Catherine’s illness to anything but the accumulation of flesh and years.

The whole of New York was darkened by the tale of Beaufort’s dishonour.  There had never, as Mr. Letterblair said, been a worse case in his memory, nor, for that matter, in the memory of the far-off Letterblair who had given his name to the firm.  The bank had continued to take in money for a whole day after its failure was inevitable; and as many of its clients belonged to one or another of the ruling clans, Beaufort’s duplicity seemed doubly cynical.  If Mrs. Beaufort had not taken the tone that such misfortunes (the word was her own) were “the test of friendship,” compassion for her might have tempered the general indignation against her husband.  As it was—­and especially after the object of her nocturnal visit to Mrs. Manson Mingott had become known—­her cynicism was held to exceed his; and she had not the excuse—­nor her detractors the satisfaction—­ of pleading that she was “a foreigner.”  It was some comfort (to those whose securities were not in jeopardy) to be able to remind themselves that Beaufort was; but, after all, if a Dallas of South Carolina took his view of the case, and glibly talked of his soon being “on his feet again,” the argument lost its edge, and there was nothing to do but to accept this awful evidence of the indissolubility of marriage.  Society must manage to get on without the Beauforts, and there was an end of it—­except indeed for such hapless victims of the disaster as Medora Manson, the poor old Miss Lannings, and certain other misguided ladies of good family who, if only they had listened to Mr. Henry van der Luyden . . .

“The best thing the Beauforts can do,” said Mrs. Archer, summing it up as if she were pronouncing a diagnosis and prescribing a course of treatment, “is to go and live at Regina’s little place in North Carolina.  Beaufort has always kept a racing stable, and he had better breed trotting horses.  I should say he had all the qualities of a successful horsedealer.”  Every one agreed with her, but no one condescended to enquire what the Beauforts really meant to do.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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