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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“What a life for you!—­” he groaned.

“Oh—­as long as it’s a part of yours.”

“And mine a part of yours?”

She nodded.

“And that’s to be all—­for either of us?”

“Well; it is all, isn’t it?”

At that he sprang up, forgetting everything but the sweetness of her face.  She rose too, not as if to meet him or to flee from him, but quietly, as though the worst of the task were done and she had only to wait; so quietly that, as he came close, her outstretched hands acted not as a check but as a guide to him.  They fell into his, while her arms, extended but not rigid, kept him far enough off to let her surrendered face say the rest.

They may have stood in that way for a long time, or only for a few moments; but it was long enough for her silence to communicate all she had to say, and for him to feel that only one thing mattered.  He must do nothing to make this meeting their last; he must leave their future in her care, asking only that she should keep fast hold of it.

“Don’t—­don’t be unhappy,” she said, with a break in her voice, as she drew her hands away; and he answered:  “You won’t go back—­you won’t go back?” as if it were the one possibility he could not bear.

“I won’t go back,” she said; and turning away she opened the door and led the way into the public dining-room.

The strident school-teachers were gathering up their possessions preparatory to a straggling flight to the wharf; across the beach lay the white steam-boat at the pier; and over the sunlit waters Boston loomed in a line of haze.

XXV.

Once more on the boat, and in the presence of others, Archer felt a tranquillity of spirit that surprised as much as it sustained him.

The day, according to any current valuation, had been a rather ridiculous failure; he had not so much as touched Madame Olenska’s hand with his lips, or extracted one word from her that gave promise of farther opportunities.  Nevertheless, for a man sick with unsatisfied love, and parting for an indefinite period from the object of his passion, he felt himself almost humiliatingly calm and comforted.  It was the perfect balance she had held between their loyalty to others and their honesty to themselves that had so stirred and yet tranquillized him; a balance not artfully calculated, as her tears and her falterings showed, but resulting naturally from her unabashed sincerity.  It filled him with a tender awe, now the danger was over, and made him thank the fates that no personal vanity, no sense of playing a part before sophisticated witnesses, had tempted him to tempt her.  Even after they had clasped hands for good-bye at the Fall River station, and he had turned away alone, the conviction remained with him of having saved out of their meeting much more than he had sacrificed.

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