The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

When he reached the stud-farm a glance showed him that the horse was not what he wanted; nevertheless he took a turn behind it in order to prove to himself that he was not in a hurry.  But at three o’clock he shook out the reins over the trotters and turned into the by-roads leading to Portsmouth.  The wind had dropped and a faint haze on the horizon showed that a fog was waiting to steal up the Saconnet on the turn of the tide; but all about him fields and woods were steeped in golden light.

He drove past grey-shingled farm-houses in orchards, past hay-fields and groves of oak, past villages with white steeples rising sharply into the fading sky; and at last, after stopping to ask the way of some men at work in a field, he turned down a lane between high banks of goldenrod and brambles.  At the end of the lane was the blue glimmer of the river; to the left, standing in front of a clump of oaks and maples, he saw a long tumble-down house with white paint peeling from its clapboards.

On the road-side facing the gateway stood one of the open sheds in which the New Englander shelters his farming implements and visitors “hitch” their “teams.”  Archer, jumping down, led his pair into the shed, and after tying them to a post turned toward the house.  The patch of lawn before it had relapsed into a hay-field; but to the left an overgrown box-garden full of dahlias and rusty rose-bushes encircled a ghostly summer-house of trellis-work that had once been white, surmounted by a wooden Cupid who had lost his bow and arrow but continued to take ineffectual aim.

Archer leaned for a while against the gate.  No one was in sight, and not a sound came from the open windows of the house:  a grizzled Newfoundland dozing before the door seemed as ineffectual a guardian as the arrowless Cupid.  It was strange to think that this place of silence and decay was the home of the turbulent Blenkers; yet Archer was sure that he was not mistaken.

For a long time he stood there, content to take in the scene, and gradually falling under its drowsy spell; but at length he roused himself to the sense of the passing time.  Should he look his fill and then drive away?  He stood irresolute, wishing suddenly to see the inside of the house, so that he might picture the room that Madame Olenska sat in.  There was nothing to prevent his walking up to the door and ringing the bell; if, as he supposed, she was away with the rest of the party, he could easily give his name, and ask permission to go into the sitting-room to write a message.

But instead, he crossed the lawn and turned toward the box-garden.  As he entered it he caught sight of something bright-coloured in the summer-house, and presently made it out to be a pink parasol.  The parasol drew him like a magnet:  he was sure it was hers.  He went into the summer-house, and sitting down on the rickety seat picked up the silken thing and looked at its carved handle, which was made of some rare wood that gave out an aromatic scent.  Archer lifted the handle to his lips.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.