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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

Miss Welland, evidently about to join the dancers, hung on the threshold, her lilies-of-the-valley in her hand (she carried no other bouquet), her face a little pale, her eyes burning with a candid excitement.  A group of young men and girls were gathered about her, and there was much hand-clasping, laughing and pleasantry on which Mrs. Welland, standing slightly apart, shed the beam of a qualified approval.  It was evident that Miss Welland was in the act of announcing her engagement, while her mother affected the air of parental reluctance considered suitable to the occasion.

Archer paused a moment.  It was at his express wish that the announcement had been made, and yet it was not thus that he would have wished to have his happiness known.  To proclaim it in the heat and noise of a crowded ball-room was to rob it of the fine bloom of privacy which should belong to things nearest the heart.  His joy was so deep that this blurring of the surface left its essence untouched; but he would have liked to keep the surface pure too.  It was something of a satisfaction to find that May Welland shared this feeling.  Her eyes fled to his beseechingly, and their look said:  “Remember, we’re doing this because it’s right.”

No appeal could have found a more immediate response in Archer’s breast; but he wished that the necessity of their action had been represented by some ideal reason, and not simply by poor Ellen Olenska.  The group about Miss Welland made way for him with significant smiles, and after taking his share of the felicitations he drew his betrothed into the middle of the ball-room floor and put his arm about her waist.

“Now we shan’t have to talk,” he said, smiling into her candid eyes, as they floated away on the soft waves of the Blue Danube.

She made no answer.  Her lips trembled into a smile, but the eyes remained distant and serious, as if bent on some ineffable vision.  “Dear,” Archer whispered, pressing her to him:  it was borne in on him that the first hours of being engaged, even if spent in a ball-room, had in them something grave and sacramental.  What a new life it was going to be, with this whiteness, radiance, goodness at one’s side!

The dance over, the two, as became an affianced couple, wandered into the conservatory; and sitting behind a tall screen of tree-ferns and camellias Newland pressed her gloved hand to his lips.

“You see I did as you asked me to,” she said.

“Yes:  I couldn’t wait,” he answered smiling.  After a moment he added:  “Only I wish it hadn’t had to be at a ball.”

“Yes, I know.”  She met his glance comprehendingly.  “But after all—­even here we’re alone together, aren’t we?”

“Oh, dearest—­always!” Archer cried.

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