The Age of Innocence eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 300 pages of information about The Age of Innocence.

“It’s a wonder,” Mrs. Welland remarked, “that they didn’t choose the Cup Race day!  Do you remember, two years ago, their giving a party for a black man on the day of Julia Mingott’s the dansant?  Luckily this time there’s nothing else going on that I know of—­for of course some of us will have to go.”

Mr. Welland sighed nervously. “`Some of us,’ my dear—­more than one?  Three o’clock is such a very awkward hour.  I have to be here at half-past three to take my drops:  it’s really no use trying to follow Bencomb’s new treatment if I don’t do it systematically; and if I join you later, of course I shall miss my drive.”  At the thought he laid down his knife and fork again, and a flush of anxiety rose to his finely-wrinkled cheek.

“There’s no reason why you should go at all, my dear,” his wife answered with a cheerfulness that had become automatic.  “I have some cards to leave at the other end of Bellevue Avenue, and I’ll drop in at about half-past three and stay long enough to make poor Amy feel that she hasn’t been slighted.”  She glanced hesitatingly at her daughter.  “And if Newland’s afternoon is provided for perhaps May can drive you out with the ponies, and try their new russet harness.”

It was a principle in the Welland family that people’s days and hours should be what Mrs. Welland called “provided for.”  The melancholy possibility of having to “kill time” (especially for those who did not care for whist or solitaire) was a vision that haunted her as the spectre of the unemployed haunts the philanthropist.  Another of her principles was that parents should never (at least visibly) interfere with the plans of their married children; and the difficulty of adjusting this respect for May’s independence with the exigency of Mr. Welland’s claims could be overcome only by the exercise of an ingenuity which left not a second of Mrs. Welland’s own time unprovided for.

“Of course I’ll drive with Papa—­I’m sure Newland will find something to do,” May said, in a tone that gently reminded her husband of his lack of response.  It was a cause of constant distress to Mrs. Welland that her son-in-law showed so little foresight in planning his days.  Often already, during the fortnight that he had passed under her roof, when she enquired how he meant to spend his afternoon, he had answered paradoxically:  “Oh, I think for a change I’ll just save it instead of spending it—­” and once, when she and May had had to go on a long-postponed round of afternoon calls, he had confessed to having lain all the afternoon under a rock on the beach below the house.

“Newland never seems to look ahead,” Mrs. Welland once ventured to complain to her daughter; and May answered serenely:  “No; but you see it doesn’t matter, because when there’s nothing particular to do he reads a book.”

“Ah, yes—­like his father!” Mrs. Welland agreed, as if allowing for an inherited oddity; and after that the question of Newland’s unemployment was tacitly dropped.

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The Age of Innocence from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.