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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 224 pages of information about Tales of Terror and Mystery.

“What do you mean, Summers?  This is no time for joking.”

“I mean what I say,” he answered.  “You have been Lord Southerton for the last six weeks, but we feared that it would retard your recovery if you were to learn it.”

Lord Southerton!  One of the richest peers in England!  I could not believe my ears.  And then suddenly I thought of the time which had elapsed, and how it coincided with my injuries.

“Then Lord Southerton must have died about the same time that I was hurt?”

“His death occurred upon that very day.”  Summers looked hard at me as I spoke, and I am convinced—­for he was a very shrewd fellow—­that he had guessed the true state of the case.  He paused for a moment as if awaiting a confidence from me, but I could not see what was to be gained by exposing such a family scandal.

“Yes, a very curious coincidence,” he continued, with the same knowing look.  “Of course, you are aware that your cousin Everard King was the next heir to the estates.  Now, if it had been you instead of him who had been torn to pieces by this tiger, or whatever it was, then of course he would have been Lord Southerton at the present moment.”

“No doubt,” said I.

“And he took such an interest in it,” said Summers.  “I happen to know that the late Lord Southerton’s valet was in his pay, and that he used to have telegrams from him every few hours to tell him how he was getting on.  That would be about the time when you were down there.  Was it not strange that he should wish to be so well informed, since he knew that he was not the direct heir?”

“Very strange,” said I.  “And now, Summers, if you will bring me my bills and a new cheque-book, we will begin to get things into order.”

Tales of Mystery

The Lost Special

The confession of Herbert de Lernac, now lying under sentence of death at Marseilles, has thrown a light upon one of the most inexplicable crimes of the century—­an incident which is, I believe, absolutely unprecedented in the criminal annals of any country:  Although there is a reluctance to discuss the matter in official circles, and little information has been given to the Press, there are still indications that the statement of this arch-criminal is corroborated by the facts, and that we have at last found a solution for a most astounding business.  As the matter is eight years old, and as its importance was somewhat obscured by a political crisis which was engaging the public attention at the time, it may be as well to state the facts as far as we have been able to ascertain them.  They are collated from the Liverpool papers of that date, from the proceedings at the inquest upon John Slater, the engine-driver, and from the records of the London and West Coast Railway Company, which have been courteously put at my disposal.  Briefly, they are as follows: 

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