Understood Betsy eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 141 pages of information about Understood Betsy.

They had said to themselves that it was their manifest duty to save the dear little thing from the other relatives, who had no idea about how to bring up a sensitive, impressionable child, and they were sure, from the way Elizabeth Ann looked at six months, that she was going to be a sensitive, impressionable child.  It is possible also that they were a little bored with their empty life in their rather forlorn, little brick house in the medium-sized city, and that they welcomed the occupation and new interests which a child would bring in.

But they thought that they chiefly desired to save dear Edward’s child from the other kin, especially from the Putney cousins, who had written down from their Vermont farm that they would be glad to take the little girl into their family.  But “Anything but the Putneys!” said Aunt Harriet, a great many times.  They were related only by marriage to her, and she had her own opinion of them as a stiffnecked, cold-hearted, undemonstrative, and hard set of New Englanders.  “I boarded near them one summer when you were a baby, Frances, and I shall never forget the way they were treating some children visiting there! ...  Oh, no, I don’t mean they abused them or beat them ... but such lack of sympathy, such perfect indifference to the sacred sensitiveness of child-life, such a starving of the child-heart ...  No, I shall never forget it!  They had chores to do ... as though they had been hired men!”

Aunt Harriet never meant to say any of this when Elizabeth Ann could hear, but the little girl’s ears were as sharp as little girls’ ears always are, and long before she was nine she knew all about the opinion Aunt Harriet had of the Putneys.  She did not know, to be sure, what “chores” were, but she took it confidently from Aunt Harriet’s voice that they were something very, very dreadful.

There was certainly neither coldness nor hardness in the way Aunt Harriet and Aunt Frances treated Elizabeth Ann.  They had really given themselves up to the new responsibility, especially Aunt Frances, who was very conscientious about everything.  As soon as the baby came there to live, Aunt Frances stopped reading novels and magazines, and re-read one book after another which told her how to bring up children.  And she joined a Mothers’ Club which met once a week.  And she took a correspondence course in mothercraft from a school in Chicago which teaches that business by mail.  So you can see that by the time Elizabeth Ann was nine years old Aunt Frances must have known all that anybody can know about how to bring up children.  And Elizabeth Ann got the benefit of it all.

She and her Aunt Frances were simply inseparable.  Aunt Frances shared in all Elizabeth Ann’s doings and even in all her thoughts.  She was especially anxious to share all the little girl’s thoughts, because she felt that the trouble with most children is that they are not understood, and she was determined that she would thoroughly understand Elizabeth Ann down to the bottom of her little mind.  Aunt Frances (down in the bottom of her own mind) thought that her mother had never really understood her, and she meant to do better by Elizabeth Ann.  She also loved the little girl with all her heart, and longed, above everything in the world, to protect her from all harm and to keep her happy and strong and well.

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Understood Betsy from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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