Rainbow Valley eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 240 pages of information about Rainbow Valley.

“I gave him life just as much as you did, Mrs. Dr. dear,” Susan was wont to say.  “He is just as much my baby as he is yours.”  And, indeed, it was always to Susan that Shirley ran, to be kissed for bumps, and rocked to sleep, and protected from well-deserved spankings.  Susan had conscientiously spanked all the other Blythe children when she thought they needed it for their souls’ good, but she would not spank Shirley nor allow his mother to do it.  Once, Dr. Blythe had spanked him and Susan had been stormily indignant.

“That man would spank an angel, Mrs. Dr. dear, that he would,” she had declared bitterly; and she would not make the poor doctor a pie for weeks.

She had taken Shirley with her to her brother’s home during his parents’ absence, while all the other children had gone to Avonlea, and she had three blessed months of him all to herself.  Nevertheless, Susan was very glad to find herself back at Ingleside, with all her darlings around her again.  Ingleside was her world and in it she reigned supreme.  Even Anne seldom questioned her decisions, much to the disgust of Mrs. Rachel Lynde of Green Gables, who gloomily told Anne, whenever she visited Four Winds, that she was letting Susan get to be entirely too much of a boss and would live to rue it.

“Here is Cornelia Bryant coming up the harbour road, Mrs. Dr. dear,” said Susan.  “She will be coming up to unload three months’ gossip on us.”

“I hope so,” said Anne, hugging her knees.  “I’m starving for Glen St. Mary gossip, Susan.  I hope Miss Cornelia can tell me everything that has happened while we’ve been away—­everything—­ who has got born, or married, or drunk; who has died, or gone away, or come, or fought, or lost a cow, or found a beau.  It’s so delightful to be home again with all the dear Glen folks, and I want to know all about them.  Why, I remember wondering, as I walked through Westminster Abbey which of her two especial beaux Millicent Drew would finally marry.  Do you know, Susan, I have a dreadful suspicion that I love gossip.”

“Well, of course, Mrs. Dr. dear,” admitted Susan, “every proper woman likes to hear the news.  I am rather interested in Millicent Drew’s case myself.  I never had a beau, much less two, and I do not mind now, for being an old maid does not hurt when you get used to it.  Millicent’s hair always looks to me as if she had swept it up with a broom.  But the men do not seem to mind that.”

“They see only her pretty, piquant, mocking, little face, Susan.”

“That may very well be, Mrs. Dr. dear.  The Good Book says that favour is deceitful and beauty is vain, but I should not have minded finding that out for myself, if it had been so ordained.  I have no doubt we will all be beautiful when we are angels, but what good will it do us then?  Speaking of gossip, however, they do say that poor Mrs. Harrison Miller over harbour tried to hang herself last week.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Rainbow Valley from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.